Sliced Head

Sliced Head

by Hugo Arcier

$ 20,-

Sliced Head

by Hugo Arcier

I like the completely flat red against the almost classical marble bust. It’s like a Michelangelo sculpture mixed with a Fontana action painting. And like the Fontana sliced paintings this sliced head poses questions about the illusion of the picture plane and the object. How do you represent a —cut— in a digital image? You could disrupt the 3D space, like here by using a 2D flat high contrast and saturation color, which negates the illusion of 3D and brings a concrete physicality to the piece by firing up all the LEDS in your display to maximum intensity.

It is only when you start taking a very close look at the image that you start to see the 3D object and the 2D plane interfere more. The head is less solid than it looks from a distance or at low resolution; it seems to vibrate, to be immaterial, it seems to be constructed of projections, vibrate with data. The illusion falls apart to reveal pure energy behind it. I am reminded of the Matrix where Neo sees the world as the virtual construction it is, and of TRON where people are trapped inside a computer. But rather than the technical side this image evokes a sense of vulnerability, pain and loss.

This image is part of a series called “Vision from the past”. The start is a rough 3D scan of Hugo’s head using a hacked Kinect device. The scan, with all the errors and artefacts, is tweaked and lighted and rendered in Maya and processed in photoshop. It captures a moment or feeling, but seen through (the lack of) memory. It is the opposite of a clear (sharp) photo; the progressive erasure of a souvenir.

What's in the download?

The download contains the final rendered and optimised image at 2666 x 4000 pixels, as well as wallpaper sized versions. A PDF outlines the process and background of the image. The 3D model that is the source for this image is also included, with a 3D viewer to interact it with.

Hugo Arcier

Hugo Arcier

Hugo Arcier is a French artist using digital media, primarily 3D computer graphics, to create videos, 2D and 3D prints and sculptures. He has build a career creating special effects for feature films, working with directors such as Roman Polanski, Alain Resnais, Jean-Pierre Jeunet and François Ozon. This allowed him to develop a deep understanding of digital tools —– in particular 3D graphic images. In his art projects he meticulously dissects the specificities of this new 3D medium. His works have been featured in numerous festivals (Videoformes, Némo, Darklight, Bitfilms, etc.), galleries (Magda Danysz, Artcore, ADN, Celal, etc.), art venues (Le Cube, Okayama Art Center, Plateforme, etc.) and contemporary art fairs (Slick, Show off) around the world.


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